What is a Commercial EPC?

  • Similar to energy efficiency labels found on appliances.
  • The certificate rates the energy efficiency of a building from A-G (A being very efficient).
  • A recommendations report accompanies the certificate and provides suggestions on how the property might be used more efficiently and the associated pay back times.

Purpose of the EPC

  • To inform potential purchasers and lessees of the energy efficiency of the building prior to a decision to occupy.

When is an EPC required?

  • From 1st October 2008, on the sale or letting of any non-domestic property, including new build.
  • Non-domestic property that was on the market before 1st October and continually marketed after, an EPC was not required until 1st January 2009. If the property was sold or let in the meantime then an EPC must be provided.
  • Currently EPC's are required prior to the marketing of all commercial properties.

Is more than one EPC required?

  • If a property is to be multi-let and has different heating and ventilation systems in these areas then more than one Commercial EPC will be required for each letting.
  • If only one floor, for example is coming to the market then rather than have an EPC for the whole, you are able to commission one for that floor alone.

Which properties are exempt?

  • Those due for demolition.
  • Places of worship.
  • Temporary buildings with a planned use of less than two years.
  • Stand alone buildings less than 50m squared.
  • Non-residential agricultural properties with low energy demand.
  • A lease renewal, lease extension or surrender does not trigger the need for an EPC.
  • A property which is subject to Compulsory Purchase.

Who is responsible for instigating an EPC?

  • It is the responsibility of the seller or prospective landlord to make available an EPC to prospective buyers/lessees.
  • If an agent is acting on their behalf, the seller/landlord should ensure that any agents are complying with the regulations.

What are the potential consequences of not having an EPC ?

  • Local Authorities (Trading Standards Officers) are responsible for enforcing the requirement to have an EPC on sale or letting of a building. They may act on complaints or undertake investigations.
  • Failure to provide an EPC when required means you may be liable to a civil penalty charge. This is fixed in most cases, at 12.5% of the rateable value of the building, with a default penalty of 750 where the formula cannot be applied.
  • The range of penalties under this formula are set with a minimum of 500 and capped at 5,000.
  • You have a defence against a penalty charge if an EPC was commissioned 14 days before it was required and despite all reasonable efforts you have not received a valid EPC at the relevant time. (Evidence will be required that a request was made).

Who pays for an EPC?

  • There are no EPC Regulations providing guidance on this matter.
  • The landlord/current owner of the property is liable for the cost of obtaining an EPC.

Who can carry out an EPC?

  • An EPC has to be produced by a qualified Energy Assessor, using approved software.
  • The Energy Assessor must be a member of a Government approved accreditation scheme.

How do I go about getting an EPC?

  • We will agree a price to provide the Commercial EPC based on:
    • Property size and location,
    • The information you can provide us with in terms of the services within the building, which will reduce our research time and in turn cost to you.
    • Whether plans are available, or whether these will have to be produced.
  • Instructions will be confirmed and payment requested prior to reports being released.
  • We will agree a convenient time to carry out the inspection and a timescale to produce the EPC.

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